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. what did the obama campaign do right and what did the romney campaign do wrong? >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about americans. this election is over. but our principles endure. >> the voters have their say. leaving washington to search for a compromise even as a fiscal crisis looms. >> this is an opportunity for the president to lead. this is his. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. gwen: here to cover another historic week dan balz of "the washington post." john dickerson of cbs news. beth reinhard of "national journal" and jeff zeleny of "new york times." >> live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1975 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. through the years from insurance to investment management from real estate to retirement solutions. as ide for ideas or nath fie ncial challenges ahead.tood still. an oth
it's winning. the romney campaign says it's winning and to be quite honest we can't tell you whoa's right but tonight we'll lie out the choices. mitt romney looking presidential in a blue suit and teleprompter told thousands of supporters, the next four days count. >> the only things that stand between us in some of the best years we've known is lack of leadership. and that's why we have elections after off. this tuesday is the moment to look into the future and imagine what we can do, to put the past four years behind us and start building a new future. >> and barack obama looking presidential yesterday in a bomber jacket in air force one saying romney is not worth the risk. >> after four years as president, you know me by now. you may not agree with every decision i've made. you may be frustrated at the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. you know i'm willing to make tough decisions even when they're not politically convenient. >> let's start by assessing these closing arguments. john, "you know me by know" can work both ways? >> it can work both
door to door to door to just find new voters. i talked to the romney campaign. they found voters that we didn't know existed in hamilton county, ohio. they just did a much better job finding these people. and in fairness, they had more time. they didn't have a primary campaign to fight. they had a lot of time do -- to do this. gwen: i don't know how many stories i read about how much they thought they were going to win. >> they with so convinced they were going to win that somebody describe today me -- described to me that when they found they lost, it was like a death in the family. the "boston globe" said they had fireworks ready to go. why did they think they were going to win? they had a fundamentally different view of the elect tort. when the public polls came out they looked at these polls and said these polls have too many democrats. there's no way this president will be able to build up the enthusiasm that way. there are a lot of polls that were pretty close. and this person said that -- they said it was inconceivable. we thought there's no way he's going match his 2008 t
the votes to win. >> his rival, mitt romney is off to the polls, and then bet -- back to the campaign trail for one final push. >> we are going to steer this countryonk onon to a course that will help the american people have a brighter future. >> and taking a spin back in time, tonight, we will show you how the competitors have stacked up over the years. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere are around the globe. election day is finally here and across the huge country, people are finally casting their ballots. today, neither candidate was taking any chances, mounted a last-minute effort to get us support at the polls. -- to get the best support at the polls. >> this is america, a democracy. this is what it is all about. >> will he stay in power for another four years or be rejected after one term? the president is checking to make sure there is no backsliding from supporters. >> we feel confident that we will win, but it will determine on voter turnout. -- be determined by voter turnout. i would encourage everyone to participate in this process that people h
's a fascinating mixture of boldness and caution. >> when mitt romney gets focused and locked in, watch out. >> stories of family... >> stanley ann dunham was really a thoroughly unconventional mother. >> he had to fend for himself. every step, he was alone. >> the dad stuff just can't be underestimated. >> he had a lot of power to him. he was our hero. >> identity... >> he told his fifth-grade class that his father was an indonesian king. >> he was a white-black kid. >> his extended family is one of the leading mormon families. >> he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. >> controversy... >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> mitt romney doesn't have an ideological bone in his body, as far as i can tell. >> and destiny. >> what unites both of these characters is this sense that there was a place that they were going, a destiny that they had. >> tonight ofrontline, "the choice 2012." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding
than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he took the job's numbers as support for the central plank of his campaign, but the u.s. economy has failed to recover. >> he said he was going to focus on creating jobs. instead he focused on obamacare, which killed jobs. he said he was going to cut
romney. 160% of voters 18 to 29. he won 52% of voters under 34. half the independent voters. 53% of those to make over $50,000 a year. 54% of those who make over $100,000 a year. first we will hear from the president. >> i believe we can lead this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions. >> we will get to the campaign and mitt romney in a minute, but first listen to what john boehner said after the election. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we are ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. let's rise above the this function and do the right thing for our country. >> later john boehner told diane sawyer he is the most reasonable, responsible person in washington and the president knows that. the fiscal cliff looms at the end of the year. will we reach a compromise before then, charles? >> i do not think it will be a comprehensive compromise. i think they will be able to patch something together. i think they will be able to agree on it true tax reform sometime next year. i
've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win or lose, it's the last time he'll campaign to save his job. he's chriscrossed a disenchanted nation, traveling 8,000 miles in three days. cajoling voters for giving him another chance. bruce springsteen add as f
romney last year saying he would get rid of fema, saying that he would turn it back to the states and showing no appreciation of the role that fema plays i tragedy. >> this is a nightmare for romneycare he is in tough spot. -- a nightmare for romney. is in a tough spot. >> you are going for a woman voters, swing voters in ohio, the so-called waitress vote, this is an ad for a president who cares about you. it is terrible for romney. maybe the polls are wrong, but if you're looking at the polls right now, obama has got it. >> did romney have momentum or was that just republican spin? >> he did have momentum after the first debate -- >> we have had a three since then -- >> what obama was never able to recapture the lead. >> i cannot say with certainty that there was momentum, no momentum. i cannot tell. you look at the polls hour after hour and you get a sense that this thing is very tight, even when you go to some of the battle ground states. >> yes, the first debate made an enormous difference in the campaign. it allowed mitt romney to reintroduce himself with no opposition on the
: with a tone-- a gracious tone, governor romney said-- and here comes his wife, anne, and there is congressman paul ryan, the vic vietial -- actually, i think it was jenna ryan's daughter come out and hug her mother in a way that -- kids give things away that sometimes adults cannot. what i i'm struck by, mark, and i wonder if you're struck by, too, is the weakness of aplaus. it seems as if the crowd can't get itself together for one big cheer. >> it's a good point. the ryan daughter hugged her mother right around the waist as a child would do in sadness and disappointment. i think it was tough because nobody came out to warm them up. usually with something like that there's music and somebody warming up the crowd then you introduce him. he just came out cold. >> ifill: which i thought was surprising. >> it was quite dramatic and quite gracious and very generous. he twice said he himself would pray for the president and asked others to pray for the president. >> ifill: but the disappointment was palpable. >> it was. it was a real sense of sadness and envy. >> i got the sense they hadn't prepar
>> ifill: president obama and mitt romney sprinted through swing states making their final arguments on this day before election day. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we start with two reports from the candidates' command centers. ray suarez is in illinois, and margaret warner is in massachusetts. >> suarez: at obama campaign headquarters in chicago, they're confident of a narrow win. >> romney's strategists are counting on the undecided independent voters breaking his way. >> ifill: then, thousands of people in new york and new jersey are still without power, cold and in the dark even as schools and businesses reopen. kwame holman has our update, one week after the storm. >> woodruff: and special correspondent rick karr tells the story of a hard-hit brooklyn neighborhood struggling to get back on its feet. >> ifill: back on the campaign trail, we head to ohio, the ultimate battleground state, where volunteers on both sides took to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willi
obama or challenger mitt romney. >> woodruff: it is just after 7:00 eastern time. polls are beginning to close in the east and the south. in fact, six states closed just txilient ago at the theng using exit polling data and surveys of early voters, the associated press is beginning to project a winner in a number of states. we're going to be watching for that as soon as we get it. i'm told, gwen, we do have one call. the networks, two television networks are projecting the state of kentucky will go for mitt romney which is not a surprise. a state that john mccain won four years ago. >> ifill: not a big surprise. all of these results will-jump-starting the all-important electoral college count. 270 is the magic number one candidate has to reach to become the next president. right now the associated press is predicting nothing because we don't know yet what is going to happen with those electoral votes. but we're waiting. >> woodruff: i just now am being told, gwen, and this information is coming in as we're sitting here. the state of indiana has been projected. mitt romney is projected
tonight, and to hear from governor romney and hear what we expect will be and what the crowd looks like is expecting a concession speech. i'm sorry, judy, back to you. >> woodruff: no, that's fine. we can stay on the pictures. i think people may be more interested in looking at the pictures than me talking. yeah, there's chicago. we may alternate back and forth as we wait to find out what's going on, and when if the president is going to speak, when and if governor romney is going to have something to say. again on the same-sex marriage, you were all making the point it has not passed anywhere before. it's been defeated. richard norton smith, i mean, the united states has come a very long way, hasn't it othis issue? >> you know, it has. it's only been what, a little more than a decade since the state of vermont during howard dean's governorship embraced the concept, then radical-- certainly politically risky-- of civicivilians. it's a social movement that that has accelerated at a pace few would have predicted in the late 90s. it's fascinating to speculate as to the future. it's one of
for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshoovidided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election o
's favor. 52% of women and 44% of men support obama. while the g.o.p.'s mitt romney has 44% of women and 51% of men in his corner. women voters in battleground states are the coveted demographic according to two campaign experts. >> i think if you look at the president has done with the economy, it is very far reaching, just across the country women have access to capital to start small business, let's not forget his very, very first bill that he signed in to law was lily ledbetter fair pay act. it's a tremendous accomplishment. i think that shows his devotion and his commitment to women. >> first thing you have to ask is, what are women concerned about today, it's jobs, job security, opportunities for themselves and for their loved ones and in particular for their kidss there a brighter future. this is mitt romney's message to women to all americans. is that he is going to put in to place economic policies that will create growth which will create the jobs, be the energy to small businesses start growing again. >> we asked the experts whether reproductive rights is a decisive issue for wom
that of mitt romney. the news came as the president returned to the campaign trail, stopping first in green bay, wisconsin. he revived his own slogan of 2008 to question mitt romney's ideas. >> governor romney has been using all his talents as a salesman to dress up these very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we've been cleaning up after for the past four years. and he is offering them up as change. ( laughter ) he's... he's saying he's the candidate of change. well, let me tell you, wisconsin, we know what change looks like. ( cheers and applause ) and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> woodruff: polls currently give the president a slight edge in wisconsin. but nationally, they are mostly dead even. romney spent his day in virginia, a tied state, telling a crowd in roanoke, that the president is clueless when it comes to business. >> and so we came up with an idea last week, which is he's going to create the department of business. ( laughter ) i don't think adding a new chair in his cabinet will help add millions of jobs on main street. w
. romney tried to be moderate center. it was too late. they have to appeal to the latino voter. thougthe latino voter will be te majority american in 2020. that is eight years away. you have to make a better appeal to them. they may have just misbegun. they have to reevaluate were there. i do not know what the answer is. the tea party held a press conference today. they blamed it on romney. they said we have -- that was the leap to establish the candidate. i do not know how they are blaming him. he won the primaries and they paid the price. tavis: there is a much talked -- so much talk. this is the guy that they did not want. they tried to pull everybody and his mama out of the ether to run for this and what it chris christie, jenna bush, -- jeb bush and the governor of texas. >> who is they? tavis: the republicans. >> when kennedy won the democratic nomination, there were only seven primaries. seven. that was called the back room. in the back room days, i am not sure that was not better. the league, the people got together and said this is our guy. when the primary system came in really
obama and governor romney have spent the day drumming up last-minute support in battleground states. >> you may be frustrated at the pace of change. i promise you, so am i sometimes. but you know that i say what i mean and i mean what i say. (cheers and applause) i said i'd tend war in iraq and i ended it. i said i'd pass health care reform. i passed it. (cheers and applause) i said i'd repeal "don't ask, don't tell." we repealed it. (cheers and applause) i said we'd crack down on reckless practices on wall street and we did. (applause) so you know where i stand. you know what i believe. you know i tell the truth. and you know that i'll fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. you know that about me. (cheers and applause) >> you see, talk is cheap but a record, that's real and it's earned with real effort. (cheers and applause) i mean, the president promised a lot of change, but change can't be measured in speeches, it has to be measured in achievements and four years ago candidate obama promised to do oh so very much but he's fallen oh so very short.
month of job growth, while mitt romney cited an up-tick in the unemployment rate as proof of an economic standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark s
this that this was one of the reasons that people voted for obama over romney was that they were concerned about climate change and they felt he was a better candidate on climate change. we had a terrible, terrible candidate on climate change and we had a candidate on climate change who needs a lot of pressure. so i feel more optimistic than i did in 2008 because in 2008 the attitude of the environmental movement was our guy just got in and we need to support him and he's going to give us the legislation that we want and we'll take his advice and we're going to be good little soldiers and now maybe i'm being overly optimistic, but i think people learn the lesson of the past four years and people now understand that what obama needs and what we need, forget what obama needs is a real independent movement with climate change at its center and it will put pressure the entire political class and there's no waiting around for obama to do it for you. >> why would you think that the next four years of a lame duck president would be more successful from your standpoint than the first four years when he's lookin
points. polls show that president obama and governor romney are in a tight race. ultimately, voters in a few key states will have the final say on who wins the white house. florida is one of those important battleground states. tom is in miami with more. tom. >> tom: susie, florida is the biggest swing state prize with the most electoral votes up for grabs. the economy, healthcare and immigration all are on display here with florida's diverse and growing population. voters in south florida today packed their umbrellas for the hot sun, and patience in some precincts. it's been a tight race in the sunshine state. compared to four years ago, it was a harder time deciding whom to vote for, for her. >> this time it came to the nitty gritty, they were fighting about real things, jobs, health care and i think they both have very good points. >> reporter: for her the decision came down to health care and medical insurance coverage, supporting president obama's effort to reform the industry. but natalie felt differently. >> there's a lot of changes in health care that really are not going to
votes come in. mr. obama has won 303 alike toro college of votes. mr. romney had 260. for the popular vote, president obama had 50.1%. nit romney hadn't 48.3%. -- mitt romney had 48.3%. we go to chicago for the obama victory. >> this is what the three looks like, a moment of it -- what victory looks like, a moment of triumph. it is not near happiness. it is a dream and the man who embodies it. barack obama savored the moment. he became the first black american to win a second term. he basked in the pride of his wife and daughters. he said alexian's can be small and silly but this was big and important. vice whether i have earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you, and you have made me a better president. with your stories and your struggles, i return to the white house more determined and inspired than ever. >> victory was delivered by a reagan and now latino vote. -- was delivered by a latino vote. >> i believe we can keep the promise of our founders, the idea if you are willing to work hard, it does not matter who you are or what you look like or who y
yesterday. his opponent mitt romney is in virginia. with the election just five days away, cautiously, politicians are moving on. >> he used to make the space where he would scrunch up his face -- >> but others never will. she lost her son to the storm. jacob was 23. he and a friend were crushed by falling tree. >> he kept calling me every 20 minutes, and finally, -- i kept calling him every 20 minutes, and finally, a man answered his phone, and i asked who he was. he said he was detective simon, and i asked where my son was, and he asked my address, said he wanted to come to my apartment. >> the lights are out. the power gone. in manhattan alone, 750,000 people are without electricity. every day that passes, businesses are losing money. >> i have never seen anything like it. look at this. what a mess. >> do you have power? >> do i have power? no, i am in the dark. >> there is one ray of light, and it is underground. the new york subway began offering restricted service this morning, allowing some commuters to take their usual journey, but it will be many months before familiar everyd
a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as good and the market views that as good news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff. more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought into the fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak. >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it might take days before we know who will occupy the oval office. that's a scary flash back to the hanging chad debacle of the 2000 election. >> i think the odds are against it. i shudder to think. but, you remember how bad it was back in 2000. it was crazy, it drove people crazy, it drove the market crazy. i don't think that happens. i think one of these guys wins handily. >> reporter: and, then there are those who
, the obama campaign spent $47 million on digital sending. and the romney campaign spent 4 my 7 million. a 10 to 1 gap. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was
romney explains why he lost. >> the president's campaign focused on certain members of his base coalition, give them extraordinary financial gifts from the government, and worked very aggressively to turn them out to vote. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> well, i just don't know where to begin this week. do we talk about republican charges of a cover-up with regard to the attack in benghazi? do we talk about sexual liaisons and e-mails? to talk about israel and gaza, the possibility of the fiscal cliff? let's start with the sex. [laughter] cia director resigns after the fbi uncovers e-mails showing that general david petraeus had an extramarital affair with his biographer, paula broadwell, a married mother of two. talk about unlimited access. the general was up on capitol hill talking about the benghazi hearings as we were recording this program, so we don't know what he said yet. >> we are safer because of the work that gave petraeus has main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on and this ends up being a single side note on what
not forget the people suffering there. meanwhile, governor mitt romney held a relief rally in the battleground state of ohio for victims of sandy. he urged americans outside the affected areas to help out in any way they can. in these final days before the election, both candidates are ramping up efforts to mobilize voters, including their faith-based supporters. kim lawton has been leading our coverage of the campaigns. she looks at the many ways religion has played a role this time around. >> both campaigns continue their active efforts to get their constituencies out to the polls next week. professor john green of the bliss institute at the university of akron says in a tight election, the campaigns look to the coalitions they can rely upon, and that includes faith coalitions. >> each side understands that every vote will count. >> green says while faith-based outreach hasn't dominated this campaign season, it has continued to be a key factor. >> a lot of that effort, though, is not on television. it's going on behind the scenes, because appealing to a particular group a
is to repeal the 20th- century. we are talking about reactionary policies if romney gets in there. any of them are going to be worse than obama. he is going to hopefully follow through on pulling u.s. troops out of afghanistan, and maybe he is going to do some other initiatives. we like his speech where he calls for nuclear abolition. it is an important issue, and we want to see him pushed out forward. it is going to be a divided government. the danger is having republicans in all three branches, reporting people to the supreme court. then we are going to be in trouble. >> it would depend on which one showed up. the same could be said about president obama. he does not follow through on a lot of what he says. >> the trick is what we do. as obama said, he is going to have to be forced to do the right thing, and we have let him down on some things. as the anti-war movement has not relieved reemerge. the occupied movement gets a certain amount of hope. the right has done a good job of putting pressure on the certainly, but even now, on people to move them in a more reactionary direction. >> what
electoral college votes for victory. governor romney, the former governor of massachusetts, conceded just after 1:00 a.m. >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about america. this election is over but our principles endure. that i believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field. we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured into the campaign as both sides sought to define the other as responsible for the country's economic and partisan gridlock. but when it became clear that the long race had ended, both candidates spoke of the need for mo
.n. ambassador and to besmirch her reputation is outrageous. gwen: and mitt romney stirs intraparty recrimination with this post-election analysis. >> it's a proven political strategy, which is give a bunch of money from the government to a group and, guess what, they'll vote for you. the giving away free stuff is a hard thing to compete with. >> we need to stop being the dumb party. we don't win elections by insulting voters. gwen: it's the circle of political life. covering the week, david wessel of the "wall street journal," helene cooper of the "new york times." martha raddatz of abc news, and charles babington of the "associated press." >> award winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> wherever it goes, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to h
all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know act
of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mean, you now have the community organizer in chief as the commander-in-chief. that started in 2008. the question is who does the community organizing now. i think president obama himself laid out the challenge to people. it happened when he was running for office in 2008. he was in the backyard of someone's house in new greet and somebody raised their hand and said what will you do about the middle east? and he relayed this story, which i had heard from harry belafonte who heard it from eleanor roosevelt. and she had told harry this story, that president obama related in the backyard, that she had brought a philip randolph to meet with fdr. and a philip randolph wa
. >> but mr. romney pitched himself as a businessman who could get things fixed, get the american economy moving again. why was that not a message that resonated as much? >> that is a great question. there is a strong argument about which one of these guys really understood what working and middle-class americans were going through. when mr. romney, talked about job creators, most americans, according to a survey that we did just at my firm, not the obama campaign leading into the election, the majority of americans thought he was talking about large corporate businesses, not small businesses who are the engine of job creation. but more importantly, more people felt that mr. obama would fight for the middle-class as opposed to governor romney. and this was because of the policies he was offering, investing in education to make college more affordable. these things reflect the value of of -- the values of american people and where they want this country to go. >> you made it sound like it was a faitaccompli -- s acompli. was there a way debbie mehserle is not getting through in a way that
is fair is that when you look at the folks who voted for mitt romney, 88% of them were non hispanic whites. >> non-hispanic whites. >> exactly, non-hispanic whites, and what that implies is that when you're in these conversations among conservatives sometimes when you don't have people from these other groups who can engage in these conversations you miss a great deal. and that's one reason why there are a lot of conservatives, myself included, who believe that we do have messages, ideas and strategies that would be relevant for achieving economic uplift and much else. but the problem is that when you don't have a more diverse group of people who are part of the conversation, then i think that it makes it very hard to translate that message to folks who are inclined to distrust. >> i would say that if you are going to target voters on the basis of the fact that they are african american or the fact that they are latino and try to prevent them from voting on that basis, voter suppression, that is being hostile to the interests of those groups. and if you start talking about self deportation
exit polls showed that mitt romney lost every demographic-- blacks, hispanics, and asians-- other than white voters, who favored the republican nominee. romney won among older voters, but the president led among those under age 44. and he captured 60% of the 18- to 29-year-old vote, which turned out in greater numbers than in 2008. exit polls also sampled attitudes on the tea party. 21% said they support the movement. 30% opposed it and 42% declared themselves neutral. we do our own sampling now, with three party members: leslie sanchez, a republican strategist and author of "los republicanos: why hispanics and republicans need each other." matt kibbe, president and c.e.o. of freedomworks, an organization that's supported tea party rallies and promotes limited government and lower taxes. and brad dayspring, a senior adviser to the conservative super pac y.g. action fund. y-g stands for young guns. he's a former aide to house majority leader eric cantor. leslie sanchez, i want to start with you. simple question: what is the number-one lesson republicans should take from tuesday's elect
and much more centralized in the leadership. so i do think that if you got say obama and boehner or romney and reid together with a relatively small number of people, you could exercise some pretty serious presidential leadership even with all the other thing going on in the country we talked about. >> rose: tom just joined us. go ahead tom. >> i'll just add to david's point i think when jon meacham 20 years from now writes the biography of president obama for his term there will certainly be a chapter that will be titled how could it be that barack obama turned out to be the worst communicating modern president in american history. and i think that's been himself has acknowledge that he had no narrative. i think that part of it was he was reacting to the hillary criticism, he just gives speeches. part of it he was truly focused on the substance of what he did. i would argue that it was not all just this noise thing. they had a very bad communication strategy and operation. there's a way of getting things across and repeating things. the way of explaining things like healthcare in a way a
, either the president or governor romney. but no one can argue that barack obama did not stand clearly and unequivocally for raising the taxes on those earning over $250,000. just as mitt romney stood for repealing affordable care act. those were sort of the two linchpins. so the president does have, i think, a legitimate point of view. the speaker acknowledges that we're going to have to raise revenues. and i thought the conversation between bob corker, the republican from tennessee and ben cardin of maryland, just both re-elected was the most encouraging that i have heard in a long time. >> woodruff: worker put it in terms of closing loopholes. >> right, the senate is not the problem here. if it was up to the senate we would have a deal. and i do think there is room for revenue. there is a distinction that boehner makes between raising the rates, which the president wants to go up to 39.5 or 6 and keeping the rates the same by closing loopholes to get more revenue that way out of the rich. you can't really get as much revenue that way. but so there is some room for a deal. i'm just s
of romney's loss, it's that the fiscal cliff now looms large on wall street. >> i think the big issue right now is the fiscal cliff, now that the election is behind us everyone is really focusing on what's going to happen at the end of this year, and of course if nothing's done by the end of the year that may very well mean a recession as early as next year. >> reporter: still, the best news for equity investors is that the election was decisive. the next few days or weeks will not be dominated by challenges or hanging chads. instead there is the hope the still divided congress will work together with a reinvigorated president to solve america's fiscal problems. and some predict that spirit of cooperation will help lift stocks higher again. >> what i encourage investors to realize however is that an agreement at some point in time is more likely than not and as a result of that you're probably going to see a relief on the other end, the last thing you want to do right now is time the market. >> reporter: here's one hopeful tidbit that might have been lost in all the recent political rhetori
're going to be shocked to learn and surprised to elsewhere that the romney campaign did not greet the news well. they said it shows the economy is virtually at a standstill because basically the unemployment rate is where it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look at the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but interestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes de
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